Jump to content
paxmiles

How do other people remember their passwords?

Recommended Posts

Used to require less changing of passwords to use the internet. Trying to set up a current wizards of the coast account for 5e play, but they want:

  • Minimum of 7 characters
  • Maximum of 29 characters
  • Uppercase letter (1 or more)
  • Lowercase letter (1 or more)
  • Number (0–9)
  • Special character (e.g., !, $, *, etc.)

I can do that, but I'm not really sure how to retain such a password. I suppose I could write it down, but writing down your password is usually the reason the password is stolen. I have enough jumbled in my head as is. How do others select passwords? Is there a site, perhaps, that has all the easy to recall passwords of this format on it? Other Suggestions?

I'm old and I don't like change. Help me, please.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I want a really secure one, I go to some random number generating site, and just have it pick numbers between 1 and 72 for a while. Those correspond to a-z and 0-9, plus the same lot with the shift key held down. Then, yeah, I write it down on a piece of paper. That bit of paper stays tucked away in a book that neither casual visitors nor burglars would be likely to open. My handwriting adds a further degree of security 😉

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use 1Password -- it supports all the OS's I use (OSX, Windows, iOS). It generates secure passwords, stores them, and integrates with browsers and many mobile apps. It syncs across devices using Dropbox. You have to pay for it, but it's worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use password a password manager as well. I honestly do not know most of my passwords anymore. Yes, they have their security vulnerabilities, but when sites get hacked, that password only works on that one site. I don't have to worry about them using the password on other common sites. This has simplified my life when I get those "we've been hacked" emails.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a password process that I have employed over the years that has worked for me.

I take the name of a item and format in a specific way to meet the criteria of the PW.

For example, let say the item in question is the bottle of Agrax Earthshade wash sitting at my desk right now. I could build the password aGreArml24 (three letters from each words, capitalizing the second letter, then adding the size of the bottle at the end). I would never have to write that down. I would either need to remember the item and sequence, or take a picture of the item as a reminder and be good. When I change the password, grab another bottle of wash and I'm good to go. 🙂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lol

1 hour ago, Brick Bungalow said:

I like to use 'Incorrect' that way the bot just tells me the password no matter what I type in. 

Pax is a master criminal in disguise, getting all of us to list out our security measures.

Well played. 😉

 

Im old, I write mine in a book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wife and I had an issue with an account being hacked so we went with a new system for all of our passwords.  Basically we went with a system where theres a word that can change but is similar, followed by a number that remains the same, then another word that can change but is similar followed by another number and a special character.  The password format remains the same, but the words change per site, for instance:

site 1: " Pizza486Blue27* "

site 2: " Cheese486Green27* "

While it could certainly be more secure with complete randomness, unless we get hit with a keylogger or similar, it would be hard to pick out our patter randomly.

We also decided to simplify those annoying security questions that I can't even legitimately answer most of the time because I'm old and can't remember the middle name of my third friend in grade school.

same idea as passwords with a twist: something like word, numbers, word *word for the specific question* numbers

So say the question is "Who is your favorite superhero?" the answer might be:

China642mudhero174

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Kelharis said:

We also decided to simplify those annoying security questions that I can't even legitimately answer most of the time because I'm old and can't remember the middle name of my third friend in grade school.

same idea as passwords with a twist: something like word, numbers, word *word for the specific question* numbers

So say the question is "Who is your favorite superhero?" the answer might be:

China642mudhero174

It's a good idea to fake those anyhow. A surprising amount of the information they ask for is out there on the internet, especially for people who have grown up with the internet and have things like their first pet or first car on their facebook or a blog post or something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/18/2018 at 1:29 PM, WestRider said:

It's a good idea to fake those anyhow. A surprising amount of the information they ask for is out there on the internet, especially for people who have grown up with the internet and have things like their first pet or first car on their facebook or a blog post or something.

Ya, my answer to those is generally some string of expletives followed by how I am not going to answer these dumb questions. It made for a fun time trying to recover access to an important account over the phone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/21/2018 at 9:14 PM, WestRider said:

I really doubt that most sites have any real way to tell the difference between a SSN and any other string of 9 numbers. It would likely be treated exactly the same as any other password.

Except if you know your SSN details, it's very obvious when they're fake.

@PumpkinHead & I, while at Pullman, had the opportunity to sign up for a credit card for a free Pita (@ Pita Pit). I had no problems coming up with 9 digits, but the people doing the sign up challenged me, the numbers I gave them followed NO pattern that they're supposed to follow... Sadly Pumpkin struggled to keep his 9 numbers straight...
(Funnily, they couldn't stop me because I didn't trip up when they challenged my false info)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Romans832 said:

Except if you know your SSN details, it's very obvious when they're fake.

@PumpkinHead & I, while at Pullman, had the opportunity to sign up for a credit card for a free Pita (@ Pita Pit). I had no problems coming up with 9 digits, but the people doing the sign up challenged me, the numbers I gave them followed NO pattern that they're supposed to follow... Sadly Pumpkin struggled to keep his 9 numbers straight...
(Funnily, they couldn't stop me because I didn't trip up when they challenged my false info)

Yeah, but how many places are likely to have an automated system to check each password for a string that might be a SSN? That was the real point I was going for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×