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Tamwulf

Escalation Painting for January

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5 minutes ago, paxmiles said:

In fairness, it's not like we play to lose either, we just don't concern ourselves with winning or losing.

The competitive player is here to win, me the casual player, I'm usually there to get out of the house...So my goal is obtained just by playing, while the competitive player has to actually do things in the game in order to reach their goal.

You are looking at the game as a binary state, one in which you must win, or you lose, and by saying "play to lose", you are reinforcing the WAAC argument. If I am not playing to win, then I am playing to lose. This is a false argument. Others look at it as a chance to meet new people, have a beer, throw some dice, talk about football while moving little toy soldiers around on a make believe battlefield. For them, playing the game is what matters, not the W/L record. If a player wants to win, that's fine. They should be able to recognize that their perspective on the game is not the same as others, and those others have an equal right to play and enjoy the game too. 

I am much more favorable to a tournament that encourages competitiveness through more than a W/L record like using painting, sportsmanship, handicapping, etc. etc. Competition really brings the ugly out in a lot of people. Have you ever played in a tournament where the W/L record was disregarded for the overall winner? They are some of the best events I have ever attended. The stress of winning the game just goes away, and you can freely make mistakes, take nonoptimized lists, and have fun. WAAC players treat such games/tournaments with disdain and anathema, boycotting the game and trying to convince others how bad they are. They can only see the binary state of W/L, and when you remove that, they don't know what to do.  

Anyways, this is all just conjecture and opinion. /shrug If I want to play, then I have to accept that others play this game for different reasons then my own, and if I can't handle it, then I won't play. I'm just trying to say that there is more to 40K then W/L and trying to win all the time. I'm not pointing any fingers, not trying to slander or slam anyone, cast disparaging remarks, etc. etc. This is just a good topic to discuss and see what others think about playing 40K. However, the purpose of this thread was about painting, and I think we've derailed it enough, eh? 😉

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Just now, Tamwulf said:

You are looking at the game as a binary state, one in which you must win, or you lose, and by saying "play to lose", you are reinforcing the WAAC argument. If I am not playing to win, then I am playing to lose. This is a false argument. Others look at it as a chance to meet new people, have a beer, throw some dice, talk about football while moving little toy soldiers around on a make believe battlefield. For them, playing the game is what matters, not the W/L record. If a player wants to win, that's fine. They should be able to recognize that their perspective on the game is not the same as others, and those others have an equal right to play and enjoy the game too. 😉

No, I do not see the game binary, I was refering to this:

 

45 minutes ago, Tamwulf said:

WAAC is the reason why we have "casual" players, and why they are called "Filthy Casuals" because they don't play to win. 

Where you were describing your definition of casual players as being those that didn't play to win.

I may have misunderstood your point.

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I've always liked the way a local hobby shop back in my high school days ran their tourneys. The Win/Loss Record was only part of the total score to select the Grand Prize winner (which would be an equally weighted total of Win/Loss, Painting, and Sportsmanship). With three second place prizes, one for the player with Best Win/Loss Record,  one for the best Painted, and one for the best Sportsmanship.

Win/Loss was scored strictly by the results of the games that got played; Painting was voted on by all the players and the tourney organizers; Sportsmanship was voted on by the players. Plus, sometimes they'd throw in a Murphy's Luck Award for the player who (at the tourney organizers' sole discretion) had the most improbably rotten luck that day.

Seemed like a fair way to balance all "three legs of the stool," as it were.

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Had a few people ask about my Ultra Ultramarines (as I like to call them). It's a tint painting technique. Loosely referred to as Candy Apple Read or Ghost Tinting. This method requires an airbrush (though you can get similar results with a brush, but it's far, far harder). 

Undercoat the model black. This is important as the metallic flake in metallic paints has to be able to reflect as brightly as possible. Then, I start with a dark silver metallic. Vallejo Gun Gray the whole model. Next, we start with "semi-zenethal highlighting". Mix some Vallejo Air Silver in with the gun gray, about 50/50, and shoot the model from the top down. This is also an OSL kinda technique where you can decide where the light source is coming from and spray from that direction. 

Let that all dry, then hit the model with pure silver this time from above. Basically, the bright silver areas are where the light is hitting the most. Let that dry completely. For the next step, you can either varnish the model for oil pin washing, or just be really careful and do line washing (paint the wash where you want it, NOT all over the model). Try to use a dark color in the final color you are using. In my case, I used Druchi Violet GW wash, but not black (unless you are doing a "Ghost Tint Black" scheme, which, come to think of it, could be really cool if you could find the tint color for it...). Let it dry, and now for the fun step. 

I used Tamiya Clear Blue, though Badger makes a paint line called Ghost Tint that does the same thing. The paint is translucent; it tints the colors underneath the paint. I use about 70% Clear Blue/30% Tamiya Thinner and spray at about 25 psi. One thin coat all over the model. Then I let it sit overnight. Next day, another clear blue layer, wait a day, another clear blue layer. By the third layer, it's about the blue I want. You have to wait for each layer to dry completely before adding another layer. This is critical. Each layer has to dry completely or it does some really weird things to the color. That's my base layer. After that, it's add the details, decals, paint the bolters, etc. etc. and Bob's your Uncle. It's a cool trick to pull off and results in a nice, shiny metallic looking Space Marine.  

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31 minutes ago, Tamwulf said:

Had a few people ask about my Ultra Ultramarines (as I like to call them).

Ooooh! That was you. I hate that I don't match names-to-faces-to-armies-to-usernames very well. I saw you last wednesday, the ultra ultra marines! Awesome army.

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23 minutes ago, Dark Trainer said:

No truer words have been spoken. Sadly I wouldn't know how to best use it...

That new hobby shop I mentioned in this thread said they were going to be getting a new model of "starter" airbrushes in soon and might be having an introductory workshop for it. 

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You guys can spend a whole $50 on a Iwata Neo found at Hobby Lobby. Compressor is gonna be about $100. With proper care (don't be like me and ruin your tips as they are $20 to replace) you should be able to basecoat 100's of models a week.

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5 hours ago, SPaceORK said:

You guys can spend a whole $50 on a Iwata Neo found at Hobby Lobby. Compressor is gonna be about $100. With proper care (don't be like me and ruin your tips as they are $20 to replace) you should be able to basecoat 100's of models a week.

Neo is a great starter. It was my first airbrush 

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I was looking at this model, it seems most of the “newbies guide to airbrushing” sources all agree that gravity feed is better than bottle feed, double action is better than single action, and that you don’t want to start out with one that’s too cheap nor too expensive...

This seems like a decent enough starter.

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