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InfestedKerrigan

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2 hours ago, Ish said:

I think the fact that they're nine-foot tall (and growing) interdimensional murder-hobos outweighs ethical considerations.

"...outweighs other ethical considerations." Placing a value on "interdimensional murder-hobos" in order to be able to weigh them against ethical considerations is, itself, an ethical consideration.

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2 hours ago, Ish said:

I think the fact that they're nine-foot tall (and growing) interdimensional murder-hobos outweighs ethical considerations.

The fact that they have a maturation cycle, and an American level of intelligence, along with an American level of war falconing, only serves to legitimize the need to label them as a non-vegan product.  An oco-lacto probably wouldn't consume them, but pesco-vegetarians likely would.

 

I am certain, however, that the Tyranids will never get Certified GMO free.

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3 hours ago, InfestedKerrigan said:

The fact that they have a maturation cycle, and an American level of intelligence, along with an American level of war falconing, only serves to legitimize the need to label them as a non-vegan product.  An ovo-lacto probably wouldn't consume them, but pesco-vegetarians likely would.

So, sort of the same kind of thing as how Capybaras are considered fish for purposes of some dietary restrictions?

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27 minutes ago, Ish said:

Whaaa—!?

They ain’t kosher. I can tell you that much.

It's to make an exception to the Catholic requirement for abstinence from eating meat during certain times, like Lent. Most of the classifications for that purpose seem to be determined by behaviour rather than the actual physical attributes of the creature in question. Beavers and Alligators are considered fish for those purposes as well.

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15 minutes ago, Ish said:

Ever realize that anyone of us – even you –could be an immortal... we just haven’t found it out yet?

I've considered that one many times. Immortality can really only be disproved via death, making it impossible to prove.

Sometimes I suspect that immortality is about free will and people die because we choose death. Given that age leads to more and more legitimate reasons to want to stop living, seems like a possibility - it's just a really bleak way of looking at things because it means that everyone you love that died did so because they chose to leave you. But I'm usually in a pretty bleak mood when I'm thinking of it (probably some bias in that conclusion).

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16 minutes ago, Ish said:

“Live forever or die trying!” That’s my motto.

Right, but if it's really hard to breath and you're in a lot of pain and you aren't going to get better and it's pretty clear that continuing to live is burdening your love ones to the point where they pity you to keep living...and your body is giving you the choice between naturally dying or living...Would you really choose living forever knowing it meant living under those conditions?

I'm not talking suicide, I'm talking about the basic will to live. Would you really stick with that motto if it meant a horrible eternity?

I've been at death's door a few times. Survival instinct is certainly a thing that takes over. I don't think it denies free will, but it definitely overpowers weak will (though I don't know for sure if it would overpower a strong will to die, since it requires me to die to find out...).

Dunno, sometimes I wonder if I'm creating the concept of free will because I fear being powerless. But, then again,  if I'm choice-less, that means any bleak way of seeing things isn't up to me.

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30 minutes ago, paxmiles said:

I'm not talking suicide, I'm talking about the basic will to live. Would you really stick with that motto if it meant a horrible eternity?

I've been at death's door a few times. Survival instinct is certainly a thing that takes over. I don't think it denies free will, but it definitely overpowers weak will (though I don't know for sure if it would overpower a strong will to die, since it requires me to die to find out...).

Dunno, sometimes I wonder if I'm creating the concept of free will because I fear being powerless. But, then again,  if I'm choice-less, that means any bleak way of seeing things isn't up to me.

I know you're not talking about suicide here, but there has actually been some research on suicide that shows that one of the biggest factors in completed suicide attempts is sufficiently strong willpower to overcome the survival instinct.

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39 minutes ago, paxmiles said:

Dunno, sometimes I wonder if I'm creating the concept of free will because I fear being powerless. But, then again,  if I'm choice-less, that means any bleak way of seeing things isn't up to me.

[Conan] shrugged his shoulders. "I have known many gods. He who denies them is as blind as he who trusts them too deeply. I seek not beyond death. It may be the blackness averred by the Nemedian skeptics, or Crom's realm of ice and cloud, or the snowy plains and vaulted halls of the Nordheimer's Valhalla.

“I know not, nor do I care.

“Let me live deep while I live; let me know the rich juices of red meat and stinging wine on my palate, the hot embrace of white arms, the mad exultation of battle when the blue blades flame and crimson, and I am content. Let teachers and priests and philosophers brood over questions of reality and illusion. I know this: if life is illusion, then I am no less an illusion, and being thus, the illusion is real to me. I live, I burn with life, I love, I slay, and am content."

—Robert E. Howard, ‘Queen of the Black Coast,’ Weird Tales 235 (May 1934) [emphasis added]

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So, in Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure, we see that in the future year of 2688 A.D. everyone lives in an idyllic utopia inspired by the music of the band Wyld Stallyns.

It’s currently 2019 A.D. and one of the most popular memes on social media and pop culture is that of “St. Keanu.” Extolling Keanu Reeves for his humble personality, insightful interviews, and general, all-round sheer niceness. (And looking damn fine in a well tailored suit.)

A lot of cultural drift can happen in 669 years... Maybe, just maybe, the future San Dimas isn’t that impossible?

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12 minutes ago, Ish said:

So, in Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure, we see that in the future year of 2688 A.D. everyone lives in an idyllic utopia inspired by the music of the band Wyld Stallyns.

It’s currently 2019 A.D. and one of the most popular memes on social media and pop culture is that of “St. Keanu.” Extolling Keanu Reeves for his humble personality, insightful interviews, and general, all-round sheer niceness. (And looking damn fine in a well tailored suit.)

A lot of cultural drift can happen in 669 years... Maybe, just maybe, the future San Dimas isn’t that impossible?

Maybe we'll find out in the third movie 😉

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17 minutes ago, Ish said:

So, in Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure, we see that in the future year of 2688 A.D. everyone lives in an idyllic utopia inspired by the music of the band Wyld Stallyns.

It’s currently 2019 A.D. and one of the most popular memes on social media and pop culture is that of “St. Keanu.” Extolling Keanu Reeves for his humble personality, insightful interviews, and general, all-round sheer niceness. (And looking damn fine in a well tailored suit.)

A lot of cultural drift can happen in 669 years... Maybe, just maybe, the future San Dimas isn’t that impossible?

Just think, with immortality, making reality to match a film's sci-fi wouldn't be impossible....

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35 minutes ago, InfestedKerrigan said:

Or disconnected enough to be past ambivalent about living.

Well, I'm pretty disconnected and my survival instinct has kicked in a few times when I was near death's door. Honestly, kinda surprised me. I look back and don't really understand why I'd choose survival. But instinct isn't really a thinking thing, so it doesn't need to make sense.

Still don't understand cutting. Apparently it works for some people. I try not to judge, but it seems kinda wasteful. Like defacing a tree. But I'm rather disconnected, so maybe cutting makes more sense for people that are better connected. One of those mysteries, I guess.

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7 hours ago, InfestedKerrigan said:

 

Or disconnected enough to be past ambivalent about living.  And the reason I don't support cutting for SI.

That's actually a separate factor. The third is the feeling of being a burden on those around you. People with all three are far more likely to actually kill themselves than even those with two of the three factors.

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